1930s Sewing - Pictorial 8048

Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

This 1930s Art Deco goodness is a result of my first traced pattern trade!  As silly as it sounds, although I've been sewing vintage for years, this was the first time I've ever traced and traded a pattern.

Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

Kelly (@seamracer on IG) was kind enough to trace this Picorial 8048 pattern not just once, but twice for me, due to a postal error that resulted in the first one being lost.  (BOOO.)   I so appreciate her extra effort!  I also have to say that she did a great job tracing and getting the directions put together.  I totally face palmed when I opened her package because I was seeing how I should have done it!  I was at a bit of a loss as to how to digitize and re-print the directions on the patterns I sent to her, and I have to admit I could have done better.  Seeing how she did it... I will now correctly trace and trade in the future, thanks to Kelly's example!


Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

I used the pattern to make the blouse version.  I still have a huge amount of this polyester suede fabric (I previously made a 1930s dress out of it), so I figured it would work for the test run.  It's terrible to work with though, very ravely and impossible to iron.  That didn't pair well with the finicky details of this pattern: bound button holes, lots of little darts, a 3/8" seam allowance.  However, I pushed through over two or three days and I'm pretty happy with the result!


Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

The only two changes I'll make in the future is to make the shoulders a bit narrower and the waistband a little smaller.  I'm still happy with how the blouse turned out, though.  It drapes nicely and it's quite comfortable, and I probably won't go back and adjust the shoulders and waistband this time around so I can treat it a bit more like a light jacket.  The extra room will help with layering.  The pattern shows a more jacket-y version, too, and I think this would look fantastic made up in a wool plaid!  I'm plotting.


Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

The buttons are connected by thread loops, so that's a fun 1930s detail.  The pattern gives an option of this kind of closure or a normal button down.  I thought these candy-shaped vintage buttons would be an interesting feature, so I went all the way Art Deco and did the toggle closure.  (Anyone know what it's really called?)


Flashback Summer: 1930s sewing - Pictorial 8048

On another note, I made this skirt from a 1930s pattern.... out of an old pair of men's trousers I got for $1 at a thrift store!  I'll be sharing more about that process soon.

What do you think?  Do you think the closure is Art Deco awesome or just plain weird?

2 comments

  1. Oh Emileigh, this turned out amazing! It looks great on you. The microsuede is a really good idea because it does sort of act like a leather (i.e. not very breatheable!) and should keep you warm! I believe this type of button closing is called link closures, and I love the buttons you chose. Now I need to finish my own coat too and we can be twins! After I make some jodhpurs pants to match, I'll post it up on my blog.

    Glad to share from my pattern stash with you. I hope we can do it again. Buying rolls of medical paper is the best thing ever for making or tracing patterns, and it's cheap to buy too! A lot of what I learned about tracing and reproducing patterns comes from my preservationist outlook for my pattern stash...it's a constant effort to catch up with these patterns that are falling to crumbles from time!

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    1. You’re making jodhpurs with it?! Yes! I can’t wait to see it!!!

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